Crypto Mining Mastermind

At the request of our readers we are looking at forming a small, virtual crypto mining group. 

This will most likely be by invitation only, with members being accepted based on their level of experience and specific areas of interest. It will also be limited to 8-12 members initially.

This will ensure that the conversation is focused on things that people will get most value from, and that people’s voices will be heard.

We envisage that the group will include:

  • Fortnightly call to discuss all things crypto
    • Rough agenda agreed with participants beforehand
    • Occasional guest / expert speakers
    • Typed up minutes from the meetings shared afterwards
  • Access to closed Facebook group for ongoing conversations

We are still in the planning stages and would very much appreciate your input on what this group could look like.

If this sounds like it could be of interest to you and you’d like to be kept in the loop as the group evolves, please register your interest using the form on our contact page, with “Mastermind” as the subject.


Monero Exchange – Top 3 Places to Buy Monero (XMR)

Monero is a cryptocurrency launched in 2014 that has become extremely popular amongst users who wish to keep the details of their transaction private as well as with miners who do not want to compete with the ASIC miners of the likes of Bitcoin.

Monero mining (or XMR mining) is easy and affordable and can be done solo, with a monero mining pool or via a cloud mining provider.

This article is for investors who do not want to go through the hassle of mining but are interested in buying and trading in the currency on a Monero exchange.

How to buy Monero

Monero is being hailed by some as one as one of the cryptocurrency investments for 2018. The fast-rising popularity of this coin has see its value grow exponentially over the last four years, in particular in 2017 when it was listed on one of the major Korean exchanges.  Buying Monero is simple, you need to:

  1. Find an exchange that trades in Monero
  2. Get yourself verified
  3. Download a Monero wallet
  4. Buy your coins

Monero Exchange

The following exchanges are trading in Monero and are recommended on the official Monero site ( Due to the anonymity of Monero, you will receive an id with which to trade.

  • Poloniex ( trades in almost all cryptocurrencies available, including XMR.  Fees are charged to Makers (those who have orders on the books before the trade) and Takers (those who place an order to match the Makers orders and effectively take it) depending on the size of the transactions. Fees are calculated on the average trading over the last 30 days.  Deposits are stored offline and the site is monitored and audited 24 hours a day for suspicious behaviour to keep hackers out. Poloniex claims to be the most active digital exchange in operation. They exchange however does not have a mobile app for trading.
  • Shapeshift (, allows you to buy currencies with your credit card as well as exchanging one cryptocurrency for another. Unlike other exchanges, you do not need to create an account to trade on Shapeshift and the funds are transferred directly into your wallet.  Shapeshift advertises that there are no fees for trading on their platform and the exchange rate you see is the rate you get, however they do deduct a “miner fee”. Shapeshift also offers exchanges on Monero, Bitcoin and other altcoins. Shapeshift offers a mobile App.
  • Bithumb ( is one of the largest exchanges based on trading volume. Based in Korea, Bithumb offers an extra service know as Bithumb Cash, which is a wallet that can be loaded on your mobile device and offers instant trading and makes trading faster and easier.

The above list is only a small percentage of the exchanges that can be used for buying and trading in XMR and are amongst the biggest and most popular. It is advisable to investigate the exchange before you start trading as the there have been reports of hacked exchanges and unverified transactions that can cause loss of your investment.  Happy trading!

Top Ethereum Mining Pools (2018)

Joining an Ethereum mining pool and combining your resources with other miners will help you see results faster and realize a quicker return on your investment.

This post will take a look at some of the top Ethereum Mining pools in 2018.

With so many mining pools at play in the market, solo miners are finding it more difficult to get blocks to process and the Ethereum mining rig that a solo-miner uses, needs to have massive processing power to be able to compete with the pools, which can be very expensive.


If you decide to join a pool, then choosing the right pool that meets your mining expectations is important, as well as understanding the different pay-out methods and how they will impact your earnings.

The larger pools, that have been mining for longer, are more reliable and you can be more certain of receiving your profits.

To calculate your expected earnings and see the best path to choose, you can use the calculator at this link.

Check out our other post on Ethereum mining calculators

If you’re interested in learning about how you can profit from trading crypto currencies, you might want to consider enrolling in a crypto currency trading course

The Best Ethereum Mining Pools for 2018

The top two Ethereum mining pools are Ethpool ( and Ethermine ( Together they have more than 27% of the network hashrate.

The two share an underlying pool, but have different payment methods. Ethermine uses the PPLNS payment method, (Pay Per Last “N” Shares) which involves some luck in the payment but on average pays 5% more. Ethpool is a predicable solo mining pool and pays on the PPS method, a standard pay per share model. Ethermine has more than 200 000 active workers and processes about 32 blocks an hour, while Ethpool has about 12500 active workers and processes about 5 blocks an hour.

See our full post on Ethpool vs Ethermine and the ethpool payout scheme

Other top pools include:

  • F2pool – Also known as Discus Fish (  F2pool has been operational since 2013 and contribute about 24% of the network hashrate.  Payments are also made via the PPS method and on a daily basis. The site is predominantly Chinese but has an English interface and has servers across Asia to ensure security and redundancy. F2pool can also be used as a litecoin mining pool.
  • Nanopool – Next on our list is Nanopool ( Nanopool currently has 40 000 Ethereum miners and accounts for 15% of the hashrate. Nanopool uses the PPLNS method to calculate payments the same as Ethermine. Payments are made several times during the day and Nanopool has servers in Asia, Europe and America. Nanopool also offers miners the option to mine in Ethereum Classic which is a split from the traditional Ethereum currency. Also see our article on Nanopool vs Ethpool.
  • MiningpoolhubMiningpoolhub ( currently generates about 7.6% of the hashrate activity on the network. The reward calculation is based on a transaction fee, a block finding fee and uncle rewards and incentives. Miningpoolhub also has servers across more than one continent (US, Europe and Asia) ensuring a redundant environment.
  • Dwarfpool – The last of our top performing Ethereum pools is Dwarfpool ( Dwarfpool uses a RBPPS payment method (round based pay per share), which is based on the PPS method. Autopayouts are done hourly and they guarantee 100% uptime due to their distributed infrastructure. Dwarfpool makes up about 13% of the network hashrate.

All these top pools offer statistical reporting and monitoring via e-mail.

There are a number of pools that support multiple currencies, we’ve covered some of these in our posts on dogecoin mining pools, and LTC mining pools.

Cloud Mining

Mining pools are not to be confused with Ethereum cloud mining where the full task of mining is outsourced to an organisation which supplies the hardware and running costs and pays you a dividend based on your investment.

Mining pool payout schemes

The various different mining pools have different payout schemes, including PPS+ vs PPLNS. These determine the method by which your contribution to the pool is calculated, and ultimately how much money you get. It is important that you understand the payment scheme before you get involved in a pool.

Nanopool vs Ethpool – Four areas for comparison

Nanopool and Ethpool are both well-established mining pools that cater for the cryptocurrency Ethereum. Mining pools are a popular way for miners of cryptocurrencies to combine their resources and increase the number of blocks solved and their chances of generating profits.

In this article we’ll consider Nanopool vs. Ethpool.

Although Nanopool and Ethpool are both popular pools there are some substantial differences between the two and understanding these differences can assist a a miner in choosing a pool that meets his needs and can help him achieve his desired outcome from mining.

Recall, there is a large and growing number of pools available, so check out our previous post on the top ETH mining pools, and on PPS+ vs PPLNS payment methods to make sure that you’re fully up to speed on what’s happening in this space. 

Nanopool vs Ethpool

Currency options

Nanopool, found at, allows miners to choose from seven different currencies to mine (Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, Siacoin, Zcash, Monero, Pascal and Electoneum). The interface on the landing page is easy to navigate and gives high-level information regarding each of the cryptocurrencies available.

Ethpool,, offers miners the option of Ethereum as a choice of currency only. As we will be looking at the difference between Nanopool and Ethpool, we will focus on what Nanopool offers for Ethereum miners only.

Payment schemes

Ethpool calculates earnings on a unique basis that can lead to rewards three times larger than other mining pools.  When a miner submits a share, their credit will increased by the difficulty of the share.

The miner with the most credits will win the next mined block and his credit reset to the current credits less the number of credit of the miner who came “second”. Uncles are also paid on top of full block rewards.

Ethpool’s fee rate is 1% and rewards are paid out immediately after 10 confirmations.

We’ve looked in more detail at the Ethpool payout scheme in this article

Nanopool uses a more traditional PPLNS (Pay per last N Shares) payout scheme to calculate rewards. This means that miners get paid based on the number shares the pool finds and has an element of luck with regards to the outcome. The fee for belonging to Nanopool is 1% and payouts happen several times a day (with a minimum payout of 0.2 ETH.

Does Nanopool pay uncles?

One question that people often as is “does Nanopool pay uncles?” Although the Nanopool site does not specifically mention the payment of uncles in their support blogs or payment breakdowns, various forums confirm that Uncles are paid by Nanopool. i.e. here.


Nanopool has approximately 85,500 active miners and more than 232,000 workers active in the pool at any given time.  The average hashrate is 32,332.1 Gh/s and  about 850 blocks are mined every 24 hours.

Ethpool is smaller with about 1040 active miners and approximately 14,000 active workers. Approximately 96 blocks are mined over a 24 hour period and the average hashrate is 2.7 th/s.


Nanopool is easy to navigate and give’s detailed pool activity statistics at any given time. Clear and simple to follow instructions are available  for first time miners to assist them to join the pool can be found under the FAQ section, including a section on the hardware required to mine Ethereum. The API is free and runs on CORs and the site includes download links for the preferred clients.

Ethpool offers excellent support to miners, including full stratum support and warnings for invalid shares.  Detailed statistics per miner and worker are available.

Final Thoughts: Nanopool vs. Ethpool

When choosing a mining pool to join, it is important calculate in advance what you can expect to earn and then understand how the different payout methods can impact this. There are many sites available on the internet with calculators.

Some of the payment methods and pools benefit long time miners that stay with one pool and some benefit miners that jump from pool to pool.  You may also wish to mine different cryotocurrencies, but stay with a single pool, where multi-currency pools such as Nanopool have an advantage, or focus on a currency and stay with a pool that over time will show you steady growth, such as Ethpool.

PPS+ vs PPLNS – Payment Options for Mining Pools (2018)

A mining pool is when a group of cryptocurrency miners combine their processing power to get quicker mining results.  The amount of processing needed to compete with mining pools has become very expensive and solo mining is no longer seen as viable an option by many.

In a mining pool, contributing miners are paid in proportion to the amount of processing power they contribute. The more powerful your rig, the more you’ll earn.


Payment for the contribution made can be calculated in different ways depending on the type of pool the miners have joined. Each pools sets their own payment scheme, you can read more about the ethpool payout scheme. In this post we will consider some of the options including PPS+ vs PPLNS.

If you’re interested in learning about how you can profit from trading crypto currencies, you might want to consider enrolling in a crypto currency trading course



The most common calculation is PPS (Pay per share) where there is a standard payout for each miner based on the amount of processing power (hashtag rate) contributed. The mining pool will pay a set rate based for each completed hash, so the more power your machine has, the more you contribute, the greater your earnings. To get an estimated idea of what you can earn, refer to for more information.

The earned amount per hash is dependant on the difficulty at a certain point in time. The difficulty is calculated on the overall hashing power of the global network.  PPS is a popular choice by miners because of the ease in which potential earnings can be calculated.


The popular alternative to PPS is PPLNS (Pay Per Last “N” Shares). This payment calculation generally gives higher payout over a long period of time, but has a level of unpredictability, or luck involved.

The PPLNS method calculates payments based on the “n” (Number) of shares that the pool finds. A pool may have a consistent number of blocks over a period of time, or may have large variances, which affects the calculation and ultimately the payout.

As you earn based on the blocks found during the time that you mine, you may see large variances in the payments. For some stats on the PPLNS payments, visit  The amount of processing power you have will have a significant impact on your earnings as your power is relative to the size of the pool instead of there being a direct proportion between input and output. If your mining rig is not as powerful as some other miners, choosing a pool that pays on PPS would be more beneficial.

There is more info on the PPLNS payment method here.

PPS+ payment method

A third Payment method PPS+ (Pay per Share Plus) was introduced towards the end of 2016 which is a combination of the PPS and PPLNS payments. Miners are paid for each share that they submit, giving them the predictable payment method of PPS, but an additional transaction fee will be paid based on the PPLNS calculation method.

This gives miners the best of both worlds as well as the potential to earn more. For a clear comparison of the payment methods see the ViaBTC page at,

For clarity, many of the pricing discussions mention Solo. This is when a miner is allocated the full payment for the block they mined alone.

Final Thoughts: PPS+ vs PPLNS

Different mining pools offer different payment options. Some pools give you the option to choose your payment method, such as ViaBTC and some have a standard payment methods for all the miners in the pool so it is important to check before committing your resources. You can also use a mining calculator to get an estimate of how much you can earn.

Check out post on the top ethereum pools for 2017 for more info on the different pools.

In short, be prepared to do your homework ans shop around before you join a pool if you want to get the maximum return from your investment in mining hardware.

PPLNS Payment Method

Mining for cryptocurrency is popular way for to generate revenue using the computing power and specialist mining hardware. There are many ways to do this, and this article will focus on the PPLNS payment method that is offered by some mining pools.

PPLNS Payment Method

Although there are many solo miners that work on their own, there is growing trend to join pools, where miners combine their resources and computing power to increase the number of transactions that can be completed in a given period, resulting in more income.

As the pools gain more popularity, the amount of resources needed by solo miners to compete increases and this becomes expensive and the ability to compete for transactions more difficult. When miner’s work alone, the calculation of the split of the coins earned for a transaction completed is simple, they get 100%.

However when a pool of miners (more than one) has contributed to the calculation, the income generated needs to be split amongst all those involved.  The two most popular forms of revenue division are PPS and PPLNS.

What does PPLNS stand for?

PPLNS is an acronym for “Pay Per Last N Shares” which calculates your average contribution over a period of time. This ensures that miners loyal to specific pool will earn on average more than miners that hop from pool to pool.

There is an element of luck involved with the PPLNS payment method as the amount of contributors in a pool can fluctuate over a period of time, but in general PPLNS payments will be about 5% higher than PPS payments for the same amount of transactions completed.


PPS stands for “Pay-per-Share” which simply calculates the percentage due to each miner based on his or her share of contributed resources to the completed transaction. This is a simple calculation that can be easily forecasted and measured and pays for every share submitted. RBPPS stands for “Round Based Pay per Share” which is very similar to the PPS payment method, but will not pay for orphaned blocks (blocks that are valid but do not belong to the main chain).

PPLNS Mining Pools

When joining a mining pool it is important that miners know what payment method the pool is using and that it meets their execrations and matches their mining activity.

Most mining pools use the PPS method to calculate payment but Ethereum mining pools that use the PPLNS method include:

  • Ethermine, the largest PPLNS Ethereum mining pool with over seventy-four thousand active miners.
  • Ethfans, the largest Chinese speaking Ethereum mining pool, based in Asia
  • Antpool, which pays on the PPNLS, PPS and Solo method and allows miners to mines for Etheruem, Bitcon and other cryptocurrencies
  • Nanopool also mines for multiple cryptocurrencies with servers based across Europe and Asia and just over 50 000 active miners. See our recent article on Nanopool vs Ethpool.

Payout schemes are one of the main considerations when weighting up different pools like Ethpool vs. EtherMine.

For miners that wish to stay with a specific mining pool and are looking for bigger payouts over a long term period, pools that offer PPLNS are a better choice than those that pay on the PPS or RBPPS method. The risk with PPLNS is that your payments could fluctuate by more that 30% over the short period (up or down), but in the long run you will do better.

Ethereum Explained

Ethereum is a recently launched cryptocurrency platform (only two years old) that is quite literally giving Bitcoin a run for it’s money. 

If you’re looking to find ethereum explained in simple terms, you’re in the right place.

What is Ethereum ?

Built on Ethereum Blockchain Technology, it enables a decentralised network of computers to exchange cryptocoins while recording and maintaining the entire history of the transaction. This ensures a cost effective, highly reliable environment that has no single point of failure.

The founder of Ethereum ,Vitalik Buterin, developed the blockchain technology to enable functionality that Bitcoin does not offer such as crowdfunding and smart-contracts, taking the possibilities of cryptocurrency into new realms in the commercial world.

There are many online videos that can assist in understanding the fundamentals of the Ethereum such as:



Although the core function of Ethereum is the exchange of cryptocoins, known as Ether, the bigger potential value lies in the smart-contract technology and its possible application across a variety of industries.  Smart contacts allow for the same transactions that happen in the real world to take place in an online cloud environment using a decentralised public blockchain, where the terms and conditions of the contract are measured and on execution, the smart contract pays out.

The contacts are stored, tracked and executed cryptographically. The attached infographic outlines in a simple format the potential uses of Ethereum.

The range of smart contract applications that people are investigating today is varied and exciting.

Ethereum Explained – How does it work?

The fundamental principle behind Ethereum is a system that is completely decentralised, creating what has been referred to as a World computer. Instead of a single server holding information, it resides with thousands of volunteers computers or nodes.

When the Ethereum program is used, thousand of nodes process the transaction and validate the new state of the contract. This process of validating the  transaction is known as mining. The state of the contract is then updated and the terms of the contract executed upon as written by the original developer or creator of the smart contract.

More information on how Ethereum works can be found on and

Ethereum mining explained

So we know the process of validating the transaction is know as mining, but how does mining work and why would it be viable for people to volunteer?

In order for the transaction to be validated, computer resources are required that will calculate the transaction.  Miners offer or volunteer their resources to create a block of valid transactions. Miners across the world compete to calculate and validate blocks first and submit their proof that the block is valid, known as proof of work.  When a miner is first to validate a new block he earns Ether which holds value as a cryptocurrency.  The more resources a miner has, the better chance he has of validating and creating a block and earning the coins. This has led to the creation of ethereum mining pools where miners combine their resources to validate blocks faster.

Two of the leading pools are Ethpool and Ethermine, through there are several others that are considered among the best ethereum mining pools.

Mining requires dedicated hardware, or rigs, which can be very expensive to purchase and run.

An online calculator for miners can be accessed at

The potential application  for Ethereum smart contracts going forward is almost limitless with significant possibilities in particular in the banking and properly markets when management of contracts is labour intensive, slow and vulnerable to human error.

Ethpool Payout Scheme

Many people have been asking for more information about the payout schemes for various Ethereum mining pools.

For example, what are the pros and cons of pps+ vs PPLNS.

In this article we’ll look specifically at the Ethpool Payout Scheme and point you in the direction of other resources where you can get more info.

EthPool Payout Scheme is slightly different to other mining pools in that it is more like solo mining and therefore doesn’t use the PPS / PPLNS / PROP methodology that some others do.

The Terms of Payment for the site states that:

“ is a predictable Ethereum solo mining pool and implements a solo mining payout scheme. Each submitted share will increase the credits of the Miner who submitted the share by the fixed share difficulty of the pool. The Miner who accumulated the most credits will receive the reward of the next block that has been mined by the pool and his credits will be reset to his current credits minus the credits of the runner up Miner. “Uncles” are distributed in a similar way only that the credits of the Miner receiving the uncle reward will not be reset.”

This also clearly sets out the pool fees, which for EthPool is 1%.

EthPool also offers a support portal that covers many other specific questions relating to payment methods, frequency of payments etc.

This page explains further that the pool operates with a solo mining payment scheme.

“This means the miner who contributed the most work to the pool will receive the full reward of the next found block (or uncle) and his work account (credits) will be reset to his current credits minus the credits of the runner up miner.”

The site has a couple of useful features that will allow you to work out when you’ll be paid, including “time to next block”, on the balance page.

Top Ethereum mining pools

We’ve looked previously at ethermine vs ethpool.

And there is some debate around which pools offers the greater payout. Many suspect that Ethermine is better for smaller miners, while ethpool benefits much larger mining operations.

Large outfits are making it more difficult for smaller miners to compete on the pool, increasing the time it takes to get paid. As a result, several miners have switched to other pools like Nanopool.

See our other article on top ethereum pools in 2017 here.

Final thought

Here is a useful run through of the payment methods for most of the top pools, including the ethpool payout scheme.

Finding the right pool is really important, and it is definitely worth taking some time to investigate your options. Have a play around with the mining calculators as well.

The differences in picking the right pool can be substantial, beyond just the processing fees. You also have to consider things like opportunity cost, if you’re tied into a pool that is taking a long time, but you can’t leave as you are awaiting payment, that is time lost that could have been much better spent in another pool.

Trezor vs Ledger Nano S

Hardware wallets are physical devices for storing cryptocurrencies and tokens in a safer and more secure environment than the traditional software wallets.  Where software wallets are often developed in open-source and generally more susceptible to hacking and theft, a hardware wallet is isolated from the Internet and has to be attached to your computer for the codes to be accessed, rendering your tokens more secure.

To date there have been no reported thefts of tokens or coins from a hardware wallet, however even hardware wallets do have their vulnerabilities.

The cost of a hardware wallet is higher than that of a software wallet and with the small returns many miners are seeing, the cost of the hardware wallet might not be easy to justify.

If you’ve invested in an ethereum rig, or cloud mining service, you definitely need a safe place to store your ether and an Ethereum hardware wallet is definitely a good bet.

Trezor vs Ledger Nano S


Trezor was first to market with a hardware wallet for cryptocurrencies in August 2014. Each Trezor wallet has a unique passcode that prevents anyone from accessing your transactions should your wallet be stolen and in cases where you Trezor is lost or stolen; you can recover your tokens by accessing the wallet with this passcode. Trezor works with a long list of client wallets such as ArcBit, Chrome Extension, Electrum, Sentinel and Etherwall. Trezor is fully supported on Windows 7 and higher, OSX and Linux platforms as well as being compatible with most Android devices which have a USB on-the –go.

Trezor safely stores tokens for Bitcoin, Litecoin, Dash, Zcash, Ethereum, Namecoin and Dogecoin.

Trezor is a small device, about the size of a key, with a screen, which connects to your computer via a USB cable.

Trezor is slightly more expensive than some of the other hardware wallets available.

Ledger Nano S

The Ledger Nano is a slightly less expensive hardware wallet option comparative to the Trezor but offers a similar level of advanced security versus a software wallet, however it does not offer passpharse support.

A passphrase is an additional text the user creates when setting up the account, which is required when the wallet needs to be recovered, thereby adding another layer of verification.  The Nano S requires the user to set up a PIN code that keeps device secure and after three failed attempts to enter the correct PIN code, the device will not be accessible.

The Ledger Nano S is very easy to setup can be done without needing to connect the device to a computer. The Open Bitcoin Privacy project voted Ledger wallets as the most private wallets available in their report in 2016.

The Ledger Nano S works with Bitcoin, Ethereum as well as Altcoins and is compatible with a variety of Cryptocurrency wallets.

You can find the ledger nano s for sale on sites such as or direct from the manufacturer.

Final Thoughts

Both the Trezor and Ledger Nano S have built in screens, which is advisable largely due to the increased security offered. Hardware wallets with a screen will display the generated password on the screen of the device, while wallets that do not have a screen will send the passcode to your phone.

As your phone is accessible via the Internet it does put the security of the passcode at risk. The screen also adds an additional level of verification when you are making payments.

If you’re interested in a hardware wallet you should also consider the ledger nano s vs keepkey.

For more info check out this useful video:



Ethpool vs Ethermine

The costs of mining Ether can be very high, with electricity costs and the cost of setting up a mining rig that can process at the speed required.

As the rewards of mining can be slow and intermittent, many miners choose to combine their hardware resources and create an ethereum mining pool, increasing the speed at which blocks are processed and the profits paid out.

This post will focus on the two main pools, Ethpool vs Ethermine. For information on other pools, see our post on the top ethereum mining pools.

Miners then share the rewards of the payout on proof of work. Ethereum is the fastest growing cryptocurrency, more than 2000% since its launch, in the market and Ethereum miner’s work for tokens called “Ether”.

Payments to the miners can work on different principles and calculations, depending on the type of pool they have joined.

Ethpool vs Ethermine

Two of the biggest Ethereum mining pools are Ethpool and Ethermine, which run on the same platform and have combined process of more than 25% of the total network hashpower. However the manner in which the pools run, and the risks and rewards are quite different. Both pools run on a global network with servers based the United States, Europe and Singapore, which are fully redundant and run 24/7.


Ethpool is a predictable solo mining pool and 100% of the proceeds are paid to the miner that contributed the most work. By using Ethpool you get the advantages of pooled mining with a solo mining payment scheme.

Ethpool offer miners the ability to mine anonymously and supports all types of Ethereum miners. Full support is offered to miners, including those using Stratum protocol. There is a big reduction in variance so miners earn their payment as soon as their work is equal to the difficulty of the block. The site includes online mining statistics and can help you estimate your earnings, when used with a calculator. The pool fee is currently 1%. Ethpool offers e-mail monitoring of your work in progress and e-mail notification of found blocks.  Ethpool has about 12,500 active workers and processes about 5 blocks an hour. Uncles (blocks that are almost correct) are paid on top of full block rewards.


Ethermine works on the PPLNS (Pay Per Last N Shares) payout scheme, which includes a luck factor in the calculation of the payment and favours loyal pool clients versus those that jump from pool to pool.

As with Ethpool, full Stratum support is available and payments are made instantly with the minimum payout being a single Ether. The pool fee for participation is also 1%. Ethermine promises all miners accurate hashtag reporting and low costs due to the efficiency of the mining rigs.

E-mail reporting and tracking is available on Ethermine as well as notifications of invalid shares and detailed per-worker and global statistics. Ethermine has more than 200,000 active workers and process about 35 blocks an hour.

Cloud Mining

As an alternative to Ethereum pool mining, a miner can use Ethereum Cloud mining, where instead of providing a Ethereum rig and combining resources, an organisation that specializes in cloud mining will do the mining on the miners behalf for a fee and then pays a percentage of the profit made.

Other Mining Pools

Although these are regarded as the two main ETH mining pools, there are other pools available, particularly a few multi currency pools. Check out our article on Nanopool vs. Ethpool to see how these two stack up.